See/Don’t Bother horror movie reviews

Reviewed by Jeremy Billingsley

 

See:

 

A Quiet Place

Just released on video and On Demand, this movie features the husband wife team of Emily Blunt and John Krasinski as they try to protect their family from monsters that have devastated the landscape, creatures that run on sound. The opening scene is so gut wrenching and horrifying, and absolutely drives the rest of the plot and clearly illustrates the motives and fears of each of the characters. Presented with minimal dialogue, this is a master class on suspense and absolute horror.

 

 

 

Sorry to Bother You

A revolutionary movie that blends genres seamlessly, the film stars Lakeith Stanfield (Get Out), Tessa Thompson (Thor: Ragnarok), Terry Crews, Patton Oswalt, Danny Glover, Steven Yeun, and Armie Hammer. As much a sociopolitical satire as it is sci-fi horror, as funny as it is scary and unflinchingly examining the occupation of telemarketer, this film by Boots Riley is definitely worth your time.

 

 

 

Don’t Bother:

 

The First Purge

Nothing about this movie makes sense. The premise is that a sociopolitical experiment has been set up in a community on Staten Island, all in the name of “science,” Marissa Tomei’s character proudly declares. The dialogue and the characters are clichéd, and the action uneven. Even incorporating what could be an interesting if not cartoonish villain, the audience is robbed of any kind of satisfactory climactic show off with the hero when the villain is dispatched unceremoniously. There are no motives for why anyone does what they do. This was my first foray into the Purge series, as I was leery about watching any of the others. I know Ethan Hawke starred in the first movie. If I want to see a horror film with him in the starring role, I’ll go back and watch Sinister.

 

 

Unfriended: Dark Web

I watched a thirty minute sitcom where one of the principal characters, stuck at the airport, proceeded to SnapChat, FaceTime, and otherwise interface via the laptop with the other members of the cast. An entertaining idea, to be sure, and a novel concept, seeing an entire episode as though we were looking at a computer screen, but by the end of the thirty minutes, I was ready to be done. This movie is a 90-minute version of that. It lacks suspense, scares, or real emotion. I don’t care about any of the characters, and I was ready to be done with this movie ten minutes in. I’m sorry to say, I stayed for the whole show. My time wasted, but it was on MoviePasses dime, so I guess there is karma in the universe.

 

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